timor-leste • raimutin

13.00 - 51.00 €  VAT incld.

sweet and syrupy with notes of apricot jam, pomelo, green apple acidity and roasted almond finish

Roast
omni roast
200g
500g
1kg
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Having found its sovereignty in 2002, Timor-Leste is one of the world’s youngest countries. As the country finds stability, the development of the agriculture sector is rapidly becoming an important pillar for the structural transformation of the country’s economy.

Timor-Leste currently faces enormous economic upheaval, as its oil reserves begin to run dry. In its place, coffee is set to become that nation’s most vital export. Raw Materials company focus their work in the municipality of Ermera. One of thirteen municipalities in the country, it is home to the largest coffee production volumes, whilst almost 60% of the municipality's population live below the poverty line. Coffee is Timor-Leste’s most important crop, and with the end of oil income, improving the coffee sector is of critical importance. Coffee is the second-highest earner for the country after oil, with 37% of households dependent on coffee for income.

However, productivity is extremely low, alongside profitability which is both low and volatile. This is because almost all coffee is sold in the commodity market for a discounted price. They plan to change this fact precisely through the production of better quality coffee, with which they can break into the specialty coffee market and get paid better for their work.

The Raimutin Wet Mill serves as a central hub for processing the cherry of the producers we work with across the Ermera municipality. Sitting at 1400 MASL, the wet mill has served not only as a place to purchase, process, and dry cherry, but as a meeting point for the village chiefs and neighbourhood leaders, and Raw Material. Expanding the reach of specialty coffee as a viable option for profitable returns includes the importance of training. The Raimutin Wet Mill has successfully served as the hub for training courses in both cultivation, picking, and processing for local producers.

The processing starts when ripe cherries are floated in water, to separate the fruit by density. The higher the density, the higher the quality of the coffee. This leaves the low density, less mature cherries to float to the surface, which are easily removed from the water. Though not used for export, these cherries are processed separately, and sold to the local market.

The station staff then meticulously hand-sort the freshly picked and well-sorted cherry, removing all damaged or underripe fruit by eye. This well-sorted harvest is now pulped, separating the cherry from the parchment coffee. The coffee then undergoes fermentation for a full 24 hours.

Once this stage is complete the parchment is washed again, removing any residual floaters and cherry skin in the process. These floaters are not discarded, but instead are sold with other low density coffee into the local market.

The parchment is then transported to raised beds, where the coffee is dried in high. The staff turn the lots regularly to ensure even airflow and sun contact, for a duration of between 15 - 20 days. When the coffee has reached a drying level of around 14%, the coffee is then transported to lower altitudes with higher temperatures, to complete the drying phase.

Once the drying is complete, the coffee is prepared for export at the Railaco dry mill.

variety timor hybrid, typica
process natural
region ermera
altitude 1400 - 1600 m.a.s.l.
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